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Friday, December 17

  1. page Keith edited Keith Multi-Genre Research Project PDF {Final Project.pdf} Post #6 Week 14
    Keith
    Multi-Genre Research Project PDF
    {Final Project.pdf}

    Post #6
    Week 14
    (view changes)
    5:09 pm
  2. 5:09 pm
  3. page Ashley edited Walt Whitman Song {Whitman.jpg} Song of Myself Analysis Analysis “Song of Mys…

    Walt Whitman
    Song{Whitman.jpg}
    Song
    of Myself
    Analysis
    Analysis
    “Song of Myself” is the perfect example of Transcendentalist Literature. Whitman wrote a huge poem about him, nature, the Cosmos, etc. The poem covers Whitman and Everything.
    Personal Reaction
    I love to read this poem, even though I find that I am not enough of an intellectual to break down all of the references, symbolism, etc. If you read it out loud, it sounds lovely, and you can appreciate the thoughtfulness that Whitman used when creating it. My favorite part is when the child asks “What is the grass?” This behavior is so typical of children, but Whitman derives much more from it.
    Specific Lines:{tlc0405.jpg} Whitman editing Whitman
    Song of Myself
    Specific Lines from the Text:

    “I am satisfied- I see, dance, laugh, sing:” I love this line. This will be my new creed. As long as I can do one of these for things I can be content with my life.
    “A child said What is the grass? Fetching it to me with full hands;”
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  6. page Ashley edited Journal Walt Whitman Song of Myself Analysis “Song of Myself” is the perfect example of …
    Journal
    Walt Whitman
    Song of Myself
    Analysis
    “Song of Myself” is the perfect example of Transcendentalist Literature. Whitman wrote a huge poem about him, nature, the Cosmos, etc. The poem covers Whitman and Everything.
    Personal Reaction
    I love to read this poem, even though I find that I am not enough of an intellectual to break down all of the references, symbolism, etc. If you read it out loud, it sounds lovely, and you can appreciate the thoughtfulness that Whitman used when creating it. My favorite part is when the child asks “What is the grass?” This behavior is so typical of children, but Whitman derives much more from it.
    Specific Lines:
    “I am satisfied- I see, dance, laugh, sing:” I love this line. This will be my new creed. As long as I can do one of these for things I can be content with my life.
    “A child said What is the grass? Fetching it to me with full hands;”
    How could I answer the child? I do not know what it is any more than he.”
    This line reminds me of my childhood when I would ask my mother “Why is the sky blue?” and she would never have an answer.
    Journal
    Entry #3
    Henry David Thoreau
    {thoreau-rowse.gif}
    "I went to the Woods, because I wished to live deliberately."
    I chose to analyze “Solitude” the fifth chapter of Henry David Thoreau's “Walden.” Thoreau wrote about walking in the woods, and marveling at everything around him. He used a lot of personification when he was describing his surroundings. Mother Nature almost became another character in the story. He wrote about what joy solitary life is, and that it is like he owns the stars/sky himself. The major theme Thoreau was trying to pass on is that we all have the power to function autonomously, away from the general public, and if we do this we can achieve great things. Some of what his statements are a paradox. He talked about being completely alone, even when he was with a group of people. This is also a paradox because he isn't alone in the woods, he had visitors to the cabin, and lived 15 minutes away from his parents. Just because he was living a solitary lifestyle, it doesn't mean he was lonely. He was connected to nature, and worshiped it religiously/spiritually. The setting of solitude was Thoreau's cabin on Walden Pond in Massachusetts.
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    I
    I have been
    {conmain.jpg} A replica of Thoreau's Cabin
    “Every little pine needle expanded and swelled with sympathy and befriended me.” This quote is an example of Thoreau's use of personification.
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    7:52 am

Tuesday, December 14

  1. page Keith edited ... {kolbe_civil_war_surgical_set.jpg} There are even some cases where Whitman comes across a pa…
    ...
    {kolbe_civil_war_surgical_set.jpg}
    There are even some cases where Whitman comes across a patient who is actively fighting death for nothing and the only thing the Doctor can do is wish for death to come fast. “(Come sweet death! Be persuaded O beautiful death! In mercy come quickly!)” Even though the doctor has been put through Hell to treat these men and it has taken a toll on his mind and body, he remains strong in the face of death and does not let it stop him. “There and more I dress with impassive hand, (yet deep in my breast a fire, a burning flame.)” He stays strong to stop people from seeing the same fate as the person from [712] saw.
    Post 5
    Week 13 Frances Ellen Watkins Harper
    Eliza Harris
    NAAL: 1191-1193
    1853, 1854
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    Eliza Harris is a poem by Frances Ellen Watkins Harper. It is interesting because it is named after a character from the anti-slave novel Uncle Tom's Cabin and it deals with Eliza and her escape with her child through an icy cold river. The woman was trying to cross the freezing Ohio river to escape her life as a slave and give her son the freedom he deserved. This was going to happen even if it ended up killing them. “For she is a mother -- her child is a slave -- she'll give him his freedom or find him a grave!” The poem is interesting because it gives a great view of how desperate slaves were becoming and how badly they wanted freedom from the South and to come up North. The poem is told in an interesting way as people look on at Eliza and how she is tired and frightened but her maternal instincts are so powerful that she won't stop until she's dead. This narrator is interesting because they feel sorrow for what the woman is going through but they don't seem to do anything but watch. The identity of these people came up a lot, were they slaves too, were they white people who didn't care that she was escaping? It makes me wonder how they could do nothing while they watched this woman almost die in a river. “A woman whose crime is the hue of her face” One of the more interesting facts that came out of this poem is the fact that Eliza's race was in question. I had assumed that she was black since I never read Uncle Tom's cabin but many of the picture depicting her make her look white and still she was a slave. From what I can find out she was lighter skinned because her parents were different races but even then she was forced to be a slave.
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    The times before the Civil War are one of the most mind-blowing times I can every recall in the United States history. The North and The South are just so different in the way they went about things and how they lived and it's a shock that before the Civil War they were united. It almost seems like a different planet when you hear some people talk about how cruel the south was and how progressive the North was. It's actually surprising that the Civil War did not happen sooner than it did. “How say that her banner in mockery waves- Her “star spangled banner”- o'er millions of slavers”
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    Post # 4
    Week 12
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